Wilder vs Fury Live Stream Full Fight 2 Free Online

The buildup is over and the massive heavyweight title fight rematch between Deontay Wilder and Tyson Fury has arrived. The two fighters meet up Saturday at MGM Grand Garden Arena for their much anticipated bout.

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The Wilder vs Fury 2 PPV card begins at 9 p.m. ET/6 p.m. PT. It costs $79.99 and can be bought through ESPN+ or Fox Sports, and then you can watch it on your TV, phone, tablet or other streaming device via either the ESPN or Fox Sports app.

Here’s a rundown of your options:

Buy Wilder vs Fury 2 PPV Through ESPN+

Whether you’re already an ESPN+ subscriber or you sign up for a month ($4.99), you can purchase the Wilder vs Fury 2 PPV for $79.99 right here:

Buy Wilder vs Fury 2 PPV

Once you’ve purchased the PPV, you can watch Wilder vs Fury and all the main card fights on your computer via ESPN.com, or you can watch on your phone (Android and iPhone compatible), tablet, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Chromecast, PlayStation 4, Xbox One or other compatible streaming device via the ESPN app.

Buy Wilder vs Fury 2 PPV Through Fox Sports

You can also buy Wilder vs Fury 2 through Fox Sports. The price is also $79.99, with the only real difference being you’ll watch through Fox’s digital platforms rather than ESPN’s.

As such, I personally recommend the ESPN option because, in my experience, ESPN’s app has been more reliable than Fox’s. But if you prefer Fox Sports, you can order it through them here:

Buy Wilder vs Fury 2 PPV on Fox

Once you’ve purchased the PPV, you can watch Wilder vs Fury and all the main card fights on your computer via FoxSports.com, or you can watch on your phone (Android and iPhone compatible), tablet, Roku, Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV, Chromecast, Xbox One or other compatible streaming device via the Fox Sports app.

Wilder vs Fury 2 Preview

After a classic first fight, Wilder and Fury are set for their highly anticipated rematch in Las Vegas. The first fight ended in a somewhat controversial split draw, but both heavyweights are eager to score a victory this time around.

Fury (29-0-1, 20 KOs) weighed in at 273 pounds, while Wilder (42-0-1, 41 KOs) was a ripped 231.

A lot has been made of Fury’s weight — which is much heavier than the 256.5 pounds he was for the first fight.

“I’ve been holding that weight for the last three months in training camp,” Fury said at the weigh-in. “I’ve been sparring every day with it, training every day, so weight is not a problem — 273 pounds of pure British beef. It’s no secret. I’m looking for a knockout of Deontay Wilder.”

Wilder isn’t concerned about his opponent’s weight, saying he’s ready to go for the bout regardless.

“I’m not worried about that. I’ve always had to fight bigger guys,” Wilder told ESPN. “That’s only going to slow him down. Holding the weight on me? I’m going to rock with it, swing with it, rock with it. I’m not worried about his weight. All I’m telling him is don’t blink. He’s nervous. Nervous energy, as always. That’s why he changed his camp up.

“At the end of the day, we’re heavyweights, so it really doesn’t matter about the weight,” Wilder added. “As you can see throughout my whole career, I’ve been underweight. I probably outweighed my opponent maybe four times in my career. So I really don’t care about weight. This just indicates that I’m in a better state and a better mind than the last time, and I’ve come for the pain.”

The two fighters had to be separated during a news conference earlier in the week, leading to their face traditional face off being banned from Saturday’s weigh-in.

“The actions of the two fighters pushing each other, which was not staged, is not indicative of the image of our sport as a major league sport, thus having a face off is not in the best interest in the health and safety of the fighters, the public and the event,” NSAC executive director Bob Bennett told ESPN. “And quite frankly, that image, where you have two professional athletes pushing each other, where somebody could get hurt, is not keeping with the image of a major league sport, and we’re a major league sport.”